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Grace Always – November/December 2013

By Eden Grace, Global Ministries Director In Africa, women are the bearers of burdens. Of course, this could be understood metaphorically, that women bear the greatest burden of poverty and lack of access to health care and education. That’s certainly very true. But also, in Africa, women carry things. Most often, they carry things on their heads. Big things. Bulky…

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Out Of My Mind – September/October 2013

By Colin Saxton, General Secretary Out of the silence and across the meetinghouse a young man stood up and bared his soul before what appeared to be an unprepared audience. In what seemed to be both an earnest prayer to God and an urgent cry for human help, he struggled to share his pain and brokenness with us. When he…

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Quaker Life – September/October 2013

Congregational Living Above the door on the inside of his room a college friend had hung a sign above the door stating, “You are now entering the mission field.” Upon first discovering his message, I asked him why he had placed it there, and he explained, “Each time I leave my room for the wider world, I read that sign….

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John Whitehead: Bearing the Weight of Others

By Steve Martin During the American Civil War, this nation’s most devastating self-inflicted blow, a conflict that took more American lives than all wars in our history combined, a Wayne County, Indiana, Baptist minister who would neither carry a weapon nor raise a hand against another human being literally bore the weight of others — wounded soldiers — on his…

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Passages: Quaker Obituaries – November/December 2013

DAWES Robert E “Bob” Dawes, 80, of LaFontaine, Indiana, went peacefully to be with Jesus on September 9, 2013. His life was dedicated to his Lord, his family, his friends and his church family. He was born May 7, 1933, in Wabash. Indiana, to Harold F. Dawes and Ruth (Gillespie) Dawes. He married Theda (Snider) Dawes on August 21, 1955….

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Book Reviews: November/December 2013

Preparing Hearts and Minds: An Activity Book for All Ages Friends United Meeting, 1998, $15 Often I find myself at a complete loss for activities that will aid in instruction about Quakerism. Preparing Hearts and Minds has been a treasure of a resource, not only for teaching in a Sunday School class, but also as activities to utilize in my…

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Ask Tom: How did early Friends take care of each other?

“Community” was not a word that before the year 1700 Friends generally used to describe the religious movement they had created, but from the vantage point of 2013, early Quakerism had a strong communal orientation, if we understand “community” to mean a group of believers united by a shared religious vision and a commitment to care for each other. In…

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Ask Tom: How did early Friends become a congregation? How did they care for each other?

By Thomas Hamm The following account, recorded three centuries ago, of how Quakerism came to the town of Settle in the north of England, is typical of how the first Friends congregations came to be: “And in Process of time, in or about ye years 1652 or 1653, it was so ordered that one of the servants and messengers of…

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FUM News in Brief – September/October 2013

UPDATE: Double Your Gift, Double the Impact Spring 2013 Matching Gift Opportunity FUM is thrilled to announce that through the faithful, generous response to the matching gift opportunity, the goal of $45,000 was exceeded. A total of $52,597.26 was received, allowing FUM to start the new fiscal year prepared to equip and energize the worldwide community it serves. Your continual…

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Book Reviews: September/October 2013

An Unhurried Life: Following Jesus’ Rhythms of Work and Rest By Alan Fadling InterVarsity Press, 2013 $12.00; 199 pages This book is one that was truly inspirational. It is meant to be read slowly and with devotional intention. Fadling encourages readers to follow a pattern of balance and care. Each chapter takes the reader from a place of hurry to…

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